The Science of Georges Seurat’s “Circus Sideshow”

Greetings, folks! Today we’re diving back into the art world with a brand new video discussing the history and science behind Neo-Impressionist pioneer George Seurat’s most mysterious work (and one of my favorite paintings) “Parade de Cirque”, or “Circus Sideshow”.

Making this video was a huge eye-opening, learning experience for me, as I’d never really paid much attention to the Impressionists before this, preferring to stay firmly in my comfort zone of American landscape and Dutch Golden Age. What are some of your favorite Impressionist works? Leave them in the comments below, and don’t forget to subscribe and follow to stay up to date on all things Bookworm History!

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The Diary of George Templeton Strong

On this new episode of “Bookworm History”, we’re discussing the man and the history behind the Diary of George Templeton Strong.  Today, his diary is one of the most valuable primary sources for historians studying the American Civil War.  Strong’s writings weren’t just limited to that conflict though.  He wrote almost daily for 40 years, providing historians with a wealth of information about New York City in the nineteenth century!  But who was the man behind the diary?

What Did Shakespeare Really Look Like?

Greetings, folks!  Just finished up a new Bookworm History episode over on the YouTube channel!  This one’s all about the various portraits and pictures thought to depict the Bard of Stratford-on-Avon, William Shakespeare and whether any of them accurately illustrate what he looked like.  Check it out!

Do you think any of these images actually depict Shakespeare?  Leave your thoughts in the comments!