Harbo, Samuelsen, and the Fantastic Voyage of “The Fox” – ‘City Full of History’ Episode 1

The first episode of “City Full of History” is here!  This week we’re talking about the intrepid, and often overlooked, voyage of George Harbo and Frank Samuelsen as they rowed “The Fox” across the Atlantic!

New CFOH episodes every Monday!  Don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss a beat!

NEW SHOW COMING SOON! New York: A City Full of History

While looking through some old newspaper archives I stumbled across an article in the New York Tribune called “A City Full of History and Nobody Cares.” Published on August 13, 1922, the piece was written by Francis A. Collins and included sketches by noted illustrator Louis M. Glackens. The crux of the article was that New York was a city in danger of losing its history. There were historical events all around, but most were unsung, unmarked, and unremembered.

Challenge Accepted!

Come along as we track down some of New York’s most fascinating unsung stories and shine a little light in some forgotten corners of history!

COMING SOON!

The Science of Georges Seurat’s “Circus Sideshow”

Greetings, folks! Today we’re diving back into the art world with a brand new video discussing the history and science behind Neo-Impressionist pioneer George Seurat’s most mysterious work (and one of my favorite paintings) “Parade de Cirque”, or “Circus Sideshow”.

Making this video was a huge eye-opening, learning experience for me, as I’d never really paid much attention to the Impressionists before this, preferring to stay firmly in my comfort zone of American landscape and Dutch Golden Age. What are some of your favorite Impressionist works? Leave them in the comments below, and don’t forget to subscribe and follow to stay up to date on all things Bookworm History!

Interested in Art History! We’ve got a playlist for that!

Facebook: facebook.com/bookwormhistory
Twitter: @bookwormhistory
Instagram: @bookwormhistory
Litsy: bookwormhistory

Finding Berlin in Binghamton: Weems, Link, and the Celestial Navigation Trainer

The year was 1939 and storm clouds were brewing over Europe.  With Germany becoming increasingly aggressive, Great Britain knew she would soon need a steady supply of pilots, navigators, and bombers – three crew types that required considerable time and money to train.  This need would bring together two of the greatest aeronautical minds of the time and would spur the creation of the most advanced flight training device ever built.

Edwin A. Link & Capt. P.V.H Weems C.N.T - Link1990R7.3984.tif - Edwin A. Link Jr. Collection - Binghamton University Libraries' Special Collections
Edwin A. Link and Captain P.V.H. Weems demonstrating the Celestial Navigation Trainer. Edwin A. Link Jr. Collection – Binghamton University Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives – Binghamton University

Continue reading “Finding Berlin in Binghamton: Weems, Link, and the Celestial Navigation Trainer”

The Story of Grand Central’s OTHER Ceiling Mural

While most people are familiar with the massive celestial mural in Manhattan’s Grand Central Terminal (I’ve done two separate articles about it myself), most don’t realize the storied railroad hub is home to another vaulted work of art.  Located in the Graybar Passage, between Grand Central Market and the Graybar building, 20 feet above commuters’ heads is an oft-overlooked painting devoted to Jazz Age industry and innovation.

IMG_3331

Continue reading “The Story of Grand Central’s OTHER Ceiling Mural”

The Diary of George Templeton Strong

On this new episode of “Bookworm History”, we’re discussing the man and the history behind the Diary of George Templeton Strong.  Today, his diary is one of the most valuable primary sources for historians studying the American Civil War.  Strong’s writings weren’t just limited to that conflict though.  He wrote almost daily for 40 years, providing historians with a wealth of information about New York City in the nineteenth century!  But who was the man behind the diary?