Kidnapping Benedict Arnold: the Saga of John Champe – ‘City Full of History’ Episode 5

This week on “City Full of History”, we visit three states to track down the saga of John Champe, the American soldier who defected TWICE and infiltrated British held New York City in an attempt to kidnap the treacherous Benedict Arnold!

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Iron Witness to History: the Bowling Green Fence – ‘City Full of History’ Episode 2

This week on “City Full of History” we visit Bowling Green Park, one of the most historic sites in New York.  Lots of people have heard the story of the tearing down of King George III’s statue, but what most don’t realize is you can go to Bowling Green and actually see the evidence of it today!

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Harbo, Samuelsen, and the Fantastic Voyage of “The Fox” – ‘City Full of History’ Episode 1

The first episode of “City Full of History” is here!  This week we’re talking about the intrepid, and often overlooked, voyage of George Harbo and Frank Samuelsen as they rowed “The Fox” across the Atlantic!

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NEW SHOW COMING SOON! New York: A City Full of History

While looking through some old newspaper archives I stumbled across an article in the New York Tribune called “A City Full of History and Nobody Cares.” Published on August 13, 1922, the piece was written by Francis A. Collins and included sketches by noted illustrator Louis M. Glackens. The crux of the article was that New York was a city in danger of losing its history. There were historical events all around, but most were unsung, unmarked, and unremembered.

Challenge Accepted!

Come along as we track down some of New York’s most fascinating unsung stories and shine a little light in some forgotten corners of history!

COMING SOON!

The Science of Georges Seurat’s “Circus Sideshow”

Greetings, folks! Today we’re diving back into the art world with a brand new video discussing the history and science behind Neo-Impressionist pioneer George Seurat’s most mysterious work (and one of my favorite paintings) “Parade de Cirque”, or “Circus Sideshow”.

Making this video was a huge eye-opening, learning experience for me, as I’d never really paid much attention to the Impressionists before this, preferring to stay firmly in my comfort zone of American landscape and Dutch Golden Age. What are some of your favorite Impressionist works? Leave them in the comments below, and don’t forget to subscribe and follow to stay up to date on all things Bookworm History!

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