Finding Berlin in Binghamton: Weems, Link, and the Celestial Navigation Trainer

The year was 1939 and storm clouds were brewing over Europe.  With Germany becoming increasingly aggressive, Great Britain knew she would soon need a steady supply of pilots, navigators, and bombers – three crew types that required considerable time and money to train.  This need would bring together two of the greatest aeronautical minds of the time and would spur the creation of the most advanced flight training device ever built.

Edwin A. Link & Capt. P.V.H Weems C.N.T - Link1990R7.3984.tif - Edwin A. Link Jr. Collection - Binghamton University Libraries' Special Collections
Edwin A. Link and Captain P.V.H. Weems demonstrating the Celestial Navigation Trainer. Edwin A. Link Jr. Collection – Binghamton University Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives – Binghamton University

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The Story of Grand Central’s OTHER Ceiling Mural

While most people are familiar with the massive celestial mural in Manhattan’s Grand Central Terminal (I’ve done two separate articles about it myself), most don’t realize the storied railroad hub is home to another vaulted work of art.  Located in the Graybar Passage, between Grand Central Market and the Graybar building, 20 feet above commuters’ heads is an oft-overlooked painting devoted to Jazz Age industry and innovation.

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The Hidden History of Grand Central Terminal’s Celestial Ceiling

Even before Grand Central Terminal officially opened on February 2, 1913 New Yorkers were teased with descriptions of the starry mural that had been painted on its vaulted ceiling, with the New York Times telling of its “effect of illimitable space” and how “fortunately there are no chairs in the concourse or…some passengers might miss their trains while contemplating this starry picture.”[1]  While the effect the painting has on commuters today is the same, the mural has undergone significant change.  In fact, it’s not even the same mural.

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The Great West Point Chain Hoax

Con artists were no strangers to early New York City.  At one time or another, nearly every major landmark in the city had been sold by a ‘matchstick man’ or grifter.  Around the turn of the twentieth century one such fraud was successfully performed by two men who targeted an artifact of slightly less renown: The Great West Point Chain.

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Image via Wikicommons user Ahodges7

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St. Louis, Missouri. Capital of the United States?

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Image used by CC-4.0, wikicommons user Daniel Schwen

While nowadays it seems a foregone conclusion that the United States capital city is Washington DC, for the first 100 years of the country’s existence it was hardly so defined.  The location, ten square miles straddling the Potomac River with portions in both Maryland and Virginia, was established by law in 1790 with the Permanent Seat of Government Act (legislation recently dramatized by the song “The Room Where It Happens” from the musical Hamilton), but this didn’t satisfy all Americans.  Over the course of the young country’s first century, the topic of where to locate the capital would come up three more times.

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The Sinking (and Explosive Dismantling) of the SS Fort Victoria

While doing work for a story I stumbled upon an article that appeared in the New York Herald-Tribune on October 26, 1930 with the headline “Sunken Fort Victoria, Menace to Navigation, is Blasted Downward Into Floor of Bay”.  It’s not what I was looking for, but with a headline like that how could I resist?

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SS Willochra

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Columbus, Kentucky. Capital of the United States?

As you drive into the Columbus-Belmont State Park, outside of Columbus, KY, a pair of historic markers greet you. The first says that Columbus was the first town in Kentucky to be picked up and moved. The re-location happened in 1927, when the town was moved further uphill with the floodwaters of the Mississippi nipping at its heels. The second sign, somewhat older looking that the first, proclaims that following the War of 1812 Columbus was one of the locations proposed as the nation’s capitol. It was this claim that piqued my interest.

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The markers at the entrance to Columbus-Belmont State Park

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