Iron Witness to History: the Bowling Green Fence – ‘City Full of History’ Episode 2

This week on “City Full of History” we visit Bowling Green Park, one of the most historic sites in New York.  Lots of people have heard the story of the tearing down of King George III’s statue, but what most don’t realize is you can go to Bowling Green and actually see the evidence of it today!

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Harbo, Samuelsen, and the Fantastic Voyage of “The Fox” – ‘City Full of History’ Episode 1

The first episode of “City Full of History” is here!  This week we’re talking about the intrepid, and often overlooked, voyage of George Harbo and Frank Samuelsen as they rowed “The Fox” across the Atlantic!

New CFOH episodes every Monday!  Don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss a beat!

NEW SHOW COMING SOON! New York: A City Full of History

While looking through some old newspaper archives I stumbled across an article in the New York Tribune called “A City Full of History and Nobody Cares.” Published on August 13, 1922, the piece was written by Francis A. Collins and included sketches by noted illustrator Louis M. Glackens. The crux of the article was that New York was a city in danger of losing its history. There were historical events all around, but most were unsung, unmarked, and unremembered.

Challenge Accepted!

Come along as we track down some of New York’s most fascinating unsung stories and shine a little light in some forgotten corners of history!

COMING SOON!

The Story of Grand Central’s OTHER Ceiling Mural

While most people are familiar with the massive celestial mural in Manhattan’s Grand Central Terminal (I’ve done two separate articles about it myself), most don’t realize the storied railroad hub is home to another vaulted work of art.  Located in the Graybar Passage, between Grand Central Market and the Graybar building, 20 feet above commuters’ heads is an oft-overlooked painting devoted to Jazz Age industry and innovation.

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The Diary of George Templeton Strong

On this new episode of “Bookworm History”, we’re discussing the man and the history behind the Diary of George Templeton Strong.  Today, his diary is one of the most valuable primary sources for historians studying the American Civil War.  Strong’s writings weren’t just limited to that conflict though.  He wrote almost daily for 40 years, providing historians with a wealth of information about New York City in the nineteenth century!  But who was the man behind the diary?

Grand Central’s Fly-On-The-Wall (Or Technically, the Ceiling)

Arguably one of the most famous ceilings in the world, the mural high above Grand Central Terminal’s main concourse is as fascinating as it is awe-inspiring.  While much has been written about it (yes, it is mostly backwards and no, no one’s really sure why Orion’s turned the way he is) one detail that seems to be overlooked is in hidden in plain sight, the proverbial fly-on-the-wall.  Or in this case, a fly on the ceiling.

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The Hidden History of Grand Central Terminal’s Celestial Ceiling

Even before Grand Central Terminal officially opened on February 2, 1913 New Yorkers were teased with descriptions of the starry mural that had been painted on its vaulted ceiling, with the New York Times telling of its “effect of illimitable space” and how “fortunately there are no chairs in the concourse or…some passengers might miss their trains while contemplating this starry picture.”[1]  While the effect the painting has on commuters today is the same, the mural has undergone significant change.  In fact, it’s not even the same mural.

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Continue reading “The Hidden History of Grand Central Terminal’s Celestial Ceiling”